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Conditions

Core Specialist Group offers a range of different treatments for the following conditions that affect the colon, rectum and anus, including:

Anal Abscess

Small glands around the anus can sometimes become infected, can cause an anal abscess to develop, which can cause severe pain.

Anal Abscess

Anal Fissure

An anal fissure is where a tear or 'rip' in the lining of the anus develops, which can lead to rectal bleeding and sometimes severe pain.

Anal Fissure

Anal Pain

Pain in the anal region can be caused by a range of different conditions. If the pain occurs during a bowel movement it is likely to be an anal fissure, although anal and rectal cancer can also cause anal pain.

Anal Pain

Bowel Incontinence

Bowel incontinence describes where you lose control, or have difficulty controlling, your bowel movements. A range of tests are used to determine the cause and there are a number of treatment options, including sacral nerve stimulation and biofeedback.

Bowel Incontinence

Colorectal (Bowel) Cancer

Colorectal cancer affects roughly 5% of Australians at some point in their life. It affects older people more than younger people and affects men slightly more than women.

Colorectal (Bowel) Cancer

Colostomy and Ileostomy

After colorectal surgery some patients may require a 'stoma', which is where a section of the bowel is attached to a 'pouch', or bag, that sits on the skin of the abdomen. The contents of the bowel then empty into this pouch instead of being passed via the anus in a bowel motion.

Colostomy and Ileostomy

Constipation

Most cases of constipation are not caused by a serious underlying condition – however, you should seek medical advice if you have experienced any change in bowel habit. Diet and lifestyle changes will generally help with regular constipation.

Constipation

Crohn's Disease

Crohn's disease (an inflammatory bowel condition) can affect any section of the digestive tract, but most commonly affects the small intestine and the colon. Symptoms of Crohn's include abdominal pain, diarrhoea and loss of weight. It affects people of all ages, but most frequently is diagnosed at a young age.

Crohn's Disease

Diverticular Disease

Diverticular disease describes where small 'pockets' or 'pouches' form in the lining of the bowel. It often develops in people as they get older and generally has no symptoms.

Diverticular Disease

Fistula

A fistula is where a 'tunnel' develops between the internal lining of the anus and the outer skin. This appears as a small opening in the skin, often accompanied by a discharge of blood or pus. In some cases, a small painful lump develops. A fistula very rarely goes away on its own - surgery is required in most cases.

Fistula

Haemorrhoids

Haemorrhoids are simply blood vessels in the upper anal canal or lower rectum that have become enlarged. In many cases there is no pain, although they can cause bleeding and they may protrude from the anus ('prolapse'). Prolapsed haemorrhoids are more likely to be painful.

Haemorrhoids

Hernia

A hernia is where tissue or organs inside the body protrude through the muscles of the abdominal wall where there are weaknesses or small holes. They sometimes appear as a small bulge or just pain or discomfort in the area. The most common hernias are 'inguinal' hernias (in the groin), 'umbilical' (on or near the navel) or 'incisional' at the site of a scar from a previous surgical incision.

Hernia

Pilonidal Sinus

A pilonidal sinus is a cavity that develops under the skin in the natal cleft (the top of the cleft of the buttocks). It is caused by body hair that grows into the skin. This cavity can become swollen and infected. Where this happens repeatedly, the best option may be surgery.

Pilonidal Sinus

Polyps

Polyps are growths on the lining of the bowel. They generally do not cause any symptoms, but may occasionally cause rectal bleeding. A colonoscopy will identify any polyps in the bowel and they can be removed during the procedure. All polyps are sent for pathology testing, since, although most are benign, some may be cancerous or pre-cancerous.

Polyps

Rectal Bleeding

Rectal bleeding can be caused by many conditions. Most conditions, such as an anal fissure or haemorrhoids, are not serious, but all cases of rectal bleeding should be investigated in case a more serious condition - such as bowel cancer - is the cause.

Rectal Bleeding

Rectal Prolapse

This where the rectum protrudes from the anus. It is more common in women than in men. In most cases it is noticed after a bowel movement and can sometimes be 'pushed back' into place. If it cannot, immediate medical attention is required.

Rectal Prolapse

Ulcerative Colitis

Like Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis is an inflammatory bowel condition. Symptoms include diarrhoea, an urgent need to have a bowel movement, rectal bleeding and a mucous discharge from the anus. Colonoscopy and tissue biopsies are used to diagnose the condition.

Ulcerative Colitis